Poem: To the New Year

Posted under: philosophy, psychology.
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New Year
At the start of each year people talk about making “new year’s resolutions”; however it seems so obligatory and somewhat banal (as are many holidays and traditions, in my opinion). We should be consistently doing self-evaluations and bettering ourselves–all year long. Not only that, but I think we value and focus on the wrong things which don’t truly make our lives richer and more fulfilling. Writing is therapeutic for me, and I enjoy writing poetry occasionally. A few months ago I wrote the following poem about making resolutions:

To the New Year

We welcome in a brand new year; it’s time to change our ways.
“Out with the old; in with the new” spurs goals for coming days.
We hear the vows and pledges made, like “I’ll commit to be
More productive, end bad habits, be a better me.

I’ll be more patient, thinner, fitter, be a better friend.
I’ll have drive and discipline,” at least to the month’s end.
Striving to be better, seeking changes and solutions
Should be constant—not reserved for “new year’s resolutions.”

Cheers to our resiliency, to conquering our fear,
To challenges we faced and overcame throughout the year.
To living life with passion, I would like to make a toast.
Invest in the relationships with those who matter most.

Seek out rich experiences, and open up your mind.
Don’t count the days, but make them count; minutia left behind.
Engage in things which cultivate your curiosity.
Life’s not a destination, but a meaningful journey.

Until death comes appreciate the time you have before you.
Strive not to be successful, but rather be of value.
Live each day to the fullest, let enrichment be your cause.
Don’t be sad because it’s over; but smile because it was.

–January 3, 2013

Comments (4) Mar 24 2013


Being a Minimalist

Posted under: philosophy, psychology, Uncategorized.
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The acquisition of material goods doesn’t bring about happiness. In fact I believe the contrary to be true. Stephanie Rosenbloom wrote an article about happiness in the New York Times. She writes:

TravelSuitcase

New studies of consumption and happiness show that people are happier when they spend money on experiences instead of material objects, when they relish what they plan to buy long before they buy it, and when they stop trying to outdo the Joneses. Current research suggests that, unlike consumption of material goods, spending on leisure and services typically strengthens social bonds, which in turn helps amplify happiness.

One major finding is that spending money for an experience produces longer-lasting satisfaction than spending money material goods. I would much rather put my money toward concert tickets, French lessons, guitar lessons, science classes, camping trips, and excursions to Europe or other countries. As professor Elizabeth W. Dunn (University of British Columbia) said: If money doesn’t make you happy then you probably aren’t spending it right.” We can reminisce about our experiences. Interestingly, no matter how many less-than-pleasant experiences come with it, we often remember the experience as a whole in a rosy, positive light. Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (1) Aug 09 2010